DOWLAND CAN SHE EXCUSE MY WRONGS PDF

Title: Can she excuse my wrongs Composer: John Dowland. Language: English Instruments: Lute. English text. Are those clear fires which vanish into smoke?

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The words are set to a dance-tune, a galliard. The song is associated with Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex , who was executed for treason in after he rebelled against Elizabeth I. The song is sometimes referred to as " The Earl of Essex Galliard" , although that title normally refers to an instrumental version, "The Earl of Essex, his galiard", scored for viol consort and lute. Dowland's lyricists are often anonymous, their identities lost over time.

Given this, it is often unclear as to whether the tune or the text came first. The tune for "Can She Excuse My Wrongs" was included in the "Dowland Lutebook", now in Washington, [1] completed at least before , before any earlier dating of the text. Edward Doughtie notes that the lyrics do not have a metric structure that combines well with music, and at times forces the singer into unusual word stresses.

For these reasons it is generally assumed that the lyrics were a later addition. By this time Essex's Rebellion had become less controversial. When Essex was executed his title was made extinct. However, as Essex had favoured James to succeed to the throne, James I was sympathetic to those involved in the Rebellion, and restored the title in for his son Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex. Dowland's dedication of the same year was therefore not risky in the way it would have been in previous years.

It has also been suggested that Dowland makes a veiled reference to the Earl in the third strain [2] by quoting the melody of the popular early 16th-century Tudor ballad, " Will Yow Walke the Woods soe Wylde ".

Both retreat to the country and, drawing from older poetic traditions, the utilisation of woodland imagery, were common features of this type of ballad. This was a popular theme in Tudor poetry and lyrical balladry, and often the poet would use the sense of political alienation to make acute, often satirical commentary on the world of the court, with all its intrigues and jostling for position.

The lyrics present a stereotypical Petrarchan lover, and appear to form a personal plea to Elizabeth I. Essex is known to have addressed poems to the Queen. Many commentators see the favours "high joys" the poet expects from his disdainful mistress as political rather than sexual.

As a virginal queen in a staunchly traditional patriarchal society, Elizabeth was naturally a focus for the imagination of English lyricists. This seems to have reached its peak during the last two decades of the s, and there is reason to believe that Elizabeth encouraged it as a means to keep ambitious suitors in competition and preoccupied with petty jealousies.

It is often performed as a lute song by soloist and lute, but, like other songs in the First Book , was originally printed in a format that can also be performed as a madrigal by a small vocal group SATB.

As one of the finest lutenists of his time, Dowland would presumably have played the lute part, although he may also have performed as a singer. Although Dowland worked for aristocratic patrons, the First Book was aimed at a wider market, and it is assumed that he did not compose "Can She Excuse My Wrongs" with highly trained singers in mind. The book sold well and appeared in various editions during the composer's lifetime.

Dowland created a version for five viols which he published in Lachrimae or Seaven Teares Figured in Seaven Passionate Pavans and another version for solo lute. It may have inspired a number of other pieces, including the unattributed "Can Shee" in the keyboard collection Fitzwilliam Virginal Book , and the "Galliard Can she excuse" transcribed in Thomas Morley 's First Booke of Consort Lessons. Dowland's music was important to the early music revival and has been perceived as relatively accessible to modern audiences.

The song's popularity in Elizabethan England can be gauged by the sales of the sheet music The First Book of Songs which went into several editions and sold thousands of copies. This was good for the time, and higher than the sales of The Second Book of Songs. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. University of California Press, The Washington Times.

Retrieved 13 Aug Retrieved Music Then and Now. Harvard University. The Musical Times , Volume , No. The Musical Times , Volume 68, No.

Can she excuse my wrongs. Categories : Compositions by John Dowland Lute songs works. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Contribute Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file.

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Can she excuse my wrongs (John Dowland)

The lover rhapsodizes over the power that this woman and her beauty have over him, and this conception of love was highly popular in Elizabethan England as we shall explore repeatedly in the coming weeks. Romeo, in the first scene of Romeo and Juliet , is initially modeled after a Petrarchan lover to the point of satire, mooning away for love of Rosaline, a girl the audience never meets, and who will be promptly forgotten with the first glimpse of Juliet. I am only passingly familiar with Petrarch, but the samples of his sonnets I read seemed to focus on the unattainability of the desired woman and the groveling unworthiness of the lover. Note that the first line of the song, out of context, can be confusing: is the persona asking for the woman he loves to excuse his faults of character?

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However, delays in postal and courier services mean that deliveries are currently taking longer than usual. This page lists all recordings of Can she excuse my wrongs? First Booke of Songes, by John Dowland This release includes a digital booklet.

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Can she excuse my wrongs, for 4 voices & lute (First Book of Songs)

The words are set to a dance-tune, a galliard. The song is associated with Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex , who was executed for treason in after he rebelled against Elizabeth I. The song is sometimes referred to as " The Earl of Essex Galliard" , although that title normally refers to an instrumental version, "The Earl of Essex, his galiard", scored for viol consort and lute. Dowland's lyricists are often anonymous, their identities lost over time. Given this, it is often unclear as to whether the tune or the text came first.

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